Storm the Cassoulet

How To Cook Golden, Juicy Chicken Breast on the Stove

per Kitchn

Serves 2 to 4

What You Need

Ingredients
2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 1 pound total)
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Equipment
Measuring cups and spoons
Knife and cutting board
Paper towels
10-inch or larger skillet (not nonstick)
Timer
Instant-read thermometer

Instructions

  1. Pat the chicken dry and season with salt and pepper. Thoroughly dry the chicken on all sides with paper towels. Season with the salt and pepper on all sides.
  2. Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a large skillet. Heat the oil in a 10-inch or larger skillet, preferably straight-sided and not nonstick (cast iron is a great option), over medium-high heat until shimmering, about 3 minutes.
  3. Carefully add the chicken to the hot pan and cook for 5 to 7 minutes. Swirl the pan just before adding the breasts to evenly distribute the oil. Add the chicken one at a time and do not touch, poke, or move the chicken for 5 to 7 minutes. If you try to turn the chicken and it feels stuck, it isn’t golden and crispy or ready to flip.
  4. Flip the chicken and cook until it reaches 165°F, 5 to 7 minutes more. Flip the breasts over and add the butter right between them. Pick up the pan and give it a gentle swirl to distribute the melting butter. Cook until they reach an internal temperature of 165°F, 5 to 7 minutes more.
  5. Slice and serve. Remove the chicken breasts to a plate or clean cutting board. Let rest for 3 minutes before slicing and serving.
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Scrambled Eggs (Bobby Flay)

The secret to Flay’s scrambled eggs is similar to Chef Ramsay’s: he also uses butter, crème fraîche, and chives in his basic soft-scrambled eggs.  The difference, however, is all in the process.

Flay starts by melting equal parts crème fraîche and unsalted butter in a non-stick pan over medium, then adding eggs (that have been pre-whisked in a bowl) and pepper right as it melts. He then continuously stirs, until he gets the soft, small-curd texture of soft-scrambled eggs, and finishes it with kosher salt and chives. Ramsay, by comparison, puts butter and eggs straight into a cold pan and cooks for 3 minutes, 30 seconds on, 30 seconds off, and only adds the salt and pepper and crème fraîche at the very end.

“No salt right until the finish, due to the fact you want people sleek curves on the eggs, and the salt will ruin that.” – Bobby Flay

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Easy Chicken Noodle Soup from a Leftover Roasted Chicken

chicken-soup-healthy

Ingredients:

 For the stock:

1 roasted chicken carcass, meat removed and reserved for the soup

1 tablespoon olive oil

3 quarts (12 cups) water

1 medium carrot, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 medium celery stalk, coarsely chopped

1/2 medium yellow onion, coarsely chopped

2 fresh thyme sprigs

1 bay leaf

1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

For the soup:

2 medium carrots, peeled and medium dice

2 medium celery stalks, medium dice

1/2 medium yellow onion, medium dice

1 bag of chopped fresh spinach

1 teaspoon kosher salt, plus more for seasoning

1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme leaves

Freshly ground black pepper

1 cup dried egg noodles (about 2 ounces) (or pastene, orecchiette,rice, etc…..)

Directions:

 For the stock:

Using a cleaver or kitchen scissors, break up the carcass into several smaller pieces so that they will fit in an even layer in the bottom of a large pot or Dutch oven; set aside.

Heat the oil in the pot over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the carcass pieces and cook, turning occasionally, until lightly browned all over, about 8 minutes.

Add the remaining ingredients and stir to combine, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon. Bring to a simmer (do not let the stock come to a boil).

Reduce the heat to low and continue to simmer, occasionally skimming any scum off the surface of the stock using a large spoon. Cook, adjusting the heat as necessary to keep the stock at a simmer, until the flavors have developed, about 1 1/2 hours.

Remove and discard any large pieces of carcass. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a 2-quart saucepan and pour the stock through the strainer (you should have about 6 cups). Discard the contents of the strainer. (At this point, the stock can be cooled to room temperature and refrigerated in a container with a tightfitting lid for up to 3 days or frozen for up to 1 month.)

 For the soup:

Bring the stock to a simmer over medium-high heat. Add the carrots, celery, onion, spinach, measured salt, and thyme, season with pepper, and stir to combine. Return to a simmer, reduce the heat to medium low, and simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.

Meanwhile, bring a medium saucepan of heavily salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the noodles and cook according to the package directions until al dente. Drain in a colander.

While the vegetables and noodles cook, shred the reserved chicken meat from the carcass into bite-size pieces. Reserve 1 1/2 cups for the soup; save the rest for another use.

When the vegetables are tender, add the drained noodles and shredded chicken, stir to combine, and return the soup to a simmer. Cook until the flavors meld, about 5 minutes more. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pastor Ryan’s Homemade Pasta

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(Pioneer Woman)

 Ingredients:

6 whole Eggs

3 cups All-purpose Flour

Method:

Rule of thumb: Two eggs per one cup of flour

Make a well in the center of your pile of flour and crack in your eggs. Slowly mix together with your hands. Turn it out onto a floured surface and knead (roll, punch, push, etc.) by hand until dough becomes smooth and pliable, adding flour to the board as necessary.

Let the dough rest for a little while before rolling it out. You can sort of figure on one egg per person to determine how much dough to make. Example: Two eggs and one cup of flour would make enough pasta dough for a dinner for two.

When you’re ready, roll it out on a floured surface as thinly as it’ll go. The noodles will plump up quite a bit when they boil in the water, so the thinner you can roll it, the better. Cut the noodles really thin. You can use a sharp knife (if you can keep it in a straight line), a pizza wheel, or a long pizza/bread cutter.

To cook the noodles, just boil them in salted water (very important!) for probably two minutes. They cook lightning fast, so don’t let ‘em go too long.

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Slow Roasted Tomato Sauce

slow roast toma

This is a slow-roasted version of stove-top tomato sauce, and it’s jam-packed with flavor. You’ll want to have it with everything — not just over pasta but on crusty bread and scrambled eggs, and paired with soft cheeses.

Ingredients:

1 pound, 6 ounces cherry tomatoes

3 cloves garlic, smashed

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh thyme (or maybe fresh basil?)

2 teaspoons packed light-brown sugar

1 teaspoon coarse salt

Method:

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Mix together tomatoes and garlic in a nonreactive 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Whisk together oil, vinegar, thyme, brown sugar, and salt in a bowl. Drizzle over tomato mixture.

Bake until tomatoes are softened and caramelized, about 1 hour. Serve warm or at room temperature. Sauce can be stored in refrigerator up to 5 days; let cool before storing.

 

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How to make PORK CHOPS

PORK CHOP

(Recipe below)

HINTS:

Pork is Pork is Pork

This is true with all meat and fish, but especially with pork: There is a huge difference in taste between your typical grocery store pork and well-raised, well-fed heritage pork. It’s worth the extra couple bucks. Here’s why.

Boneless is Better

Generally, we like our meat and poultry to be bone-in. There are a couple of reasons: First, it slows down the meat’s cooking, so it gives you a little more leeway to get a good, crispy sear on your chop. Second, the bone gives the meat a richer flavor. Yeah, you should keep that bone in there.

A Little Salt, a Little Pepper

No. A LOT of salt. A LOT of pepper. As with all meat, you want to season that sucker so much that you can see the salt and pepper on the surface when you’re standing a couple feet away. This will make your crust incredibly flavorful—the combination of salt, caramelized meat, and fat will push your chop over the top.

From Fridge to Frying Pan

Let your chops sit on the counter for about 30 minutes before you begin to cook them. If the meat is too cold, the outside will overcook while the inside comes to the right temperature. Giving the pork a little time to warm up will ensure a nice crust on the outside, with a tender center. (Well, if you follow the next few pieces of advice, that is…)

Let That Pan Rip

For chops, we like to get our pan screaming hot…then take it down to medium. That first blast of heat helps get a good golden crust. But, if you keep it that high, the chop won’t cook evenly through the middle. Medium heat helps keep the outer edges of the meat tender while the center reaches the perfect temperature.

Trust Your Recipe’s Cooking Time

With all meat and poultry—but especially pork chops—use your thermometer to tell when the meat is done cooking. A recipe’s timing is usually a ballpark estimate. Cook your chop until it’s around 135 degrees, then transfer it to a cutting board—the residual heat will bring it to the USDA’s recommended 145 degrees. Pork is pretty easy to dry out, so making sure it’s not a degree over 145 is the best way to get juicy, tender meat.

Trim the Fat

Most pork chops have a little layer of fat around the perimeter—take advantage of it! Instead of cutting it off before or after the chop is cooked, stand the chop on its side in the pan with your tongs and get that fat rendered, brown, and crispy. Trust us, you won’t regret it.

Dig Right In

After you get your pork on the cutting board, don’t touch it for 10 minutes. If you cut into it right away, all its juices will run onto the board instead of getting redistributed into the meat. Don’t let all that delicious liquid run away!

PAN-ROASTED BRINED PORK CHOP

Ingredients:

1/2 cup kosher salt

1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon juniper berries

1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

1 head of garlic, halved crosswise, plus 2 unpeeled cloves for basting

2 large sprigs thyme

1 2-inch-thick bone-in pork chop (2 ribs; about 1 1/4 lb.)

2 tablespoons grapeseed or vegetable oil

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Flaky or coarse sea salt

Preparation:

Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add kosher salt, sugar, juniper berries, peppercorns, halved head of garlic, and 1 thyme sprig; stir to dissolve salt and sugar. Transfer to a medium bowl and add 5 cups ice cubes. Stir until brine is cool. Add pork chop; cover and chill for at least 8 and up to 12 hours.

Preheat oven to 450°. Set a wire rack inside a rimmed baking sheet. Remove chop from brine; pat dry. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a large cast-iron or other oven-proof skillet. Cook chop until beginning to brown, 3-4 minutes. Turn and cook until second side is beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Keep turning chop every 2 minutes until both sides are deep golden brown, 10-12 minutes total.

Transfer skillet to oven and roast chop, turning every 2 minutes to prevent it from browning too quickly, until an instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center of meat registers 135°, about 14 minutes. (Chop will continue to cook during basting and resting.)

Carefully drain fat from skillet and place over medium heat. Add butter, 2 unpeeled garlic cloves, and remaining thyme sprig; cook until butter is foamy. Carefully tip skillet and, using a large spoon, baste chop repeatedly with butter until butter is brown and smells nutty, 2-3 minutes.

Transfer pork chop to prepared rack and let rest, turning often to ensure juices are evenly distributed, for 15 minutes. Cut pork from bones, slice, and sprinkle with sea salt.

 

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Roasting Turkey in a Convection Oven

Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Follow the cooking times below for a roasted turkey in a convection oven.

6 to 10 lbs.: 1 1/4 to 1 3/4 hours.
10 to 14 lbs.: 1 3/4 to 2 1/4 hours.
14 to 18 lbs.: 2 1/4 to 2 1/2 hours.
18 to 22 lbs.: 2 1/2 to three hours.
22 to 24 lbs.: 3 to 3 3/4 hours.

Proper preparation prior to cooking is important. Roast your turkey in the center of the oven, so that the air can properly circulate around the bird. If you’re using two oven racks at the time, put the bird on the lower rack, and if more than one pan is used, place them at opposite sides of the oven so that the pans do not overlap. Your bird will need plenty of room for the air, so make sure that there is at least 1 ½ to 2 inches of free space surrounding the pan. Place the turkey breast on a turkey lifter in the roasting pan. Cover the wings and drumsticks with foil, as they brown more quickly than the rest of the bird

Using a convection over requires lower temperatures than conventional ovens; set the oven temperature for 300 degrees F. You don’t have to baste the turkey during cooking, but if you’re using a marinade or sauce, wait until the end of cooking to baste.
Cooking time varies by weight, but an unstuffed bird of 14 to 18 lb. should cook for about 2 ¼ to 2 ½ hours. If the unstuffed turkey is 18 to 22 lb., extend the cooking time to 2 ½ to 3 hours. Stuffed birds take a little longer; allow for a cooking time of 2 ½ to 3 hours for a 14 to 18 lb. bird, or 3 to 3 ½ hours for a stuffed, 18 to 22 lb. bird. If you need to open the oven door often during cooking, the time required will be increased due to heat loss.

There are a few other variables to keep in mind that may affect cooking times. If your turkey is partially frozen, cooking time will be extended and the turkey may over-brown. To slow browning, cover the turkey with a foil tent; this will extend cooking time as well. Shinier metal pans cook turkey slower than darker roasting pans, and the larger and deeper the roasting pan, the greater the cooking time, due to reduced heat circulation around the turkey. Finally, if you use a lid on your roasting pan, the cooking time will be reduced.

Your turkey is finished when the temperature at the center of the stuffing reaches 165 degrees F, and the thigh temperature is 180 degrees F. Juices from your bird should be clear, and are easily checked by deeply piercing the thigh muscle. If the juices are reddish pink, the bird will need a bit more time in your oven. Place your turkey onto a platter, remove the lifter and let the bird stand for about 15 minutes for the juices to set.

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Substitutions

substitutions

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Homemade Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup Recipe

hersheys-chocolate-syrup-and-milk

Makes about 16 ounces (2 cups)

Ingredients:

3/4 cup cocoa powder

1 1/4 cups water

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Dash salt

Method:

Use a big saucepan – at least 2 quarts. This will expand when boiling, and overflows will make a big mess on your stovetop! (I use this 3-quart saucepan that was part of a bigger set I received as a gift. It’s my favorite!)

Combine the cocoa powder, water, sugar and salt in a saucepan over medium heat. Mix with a whisk until smooth.

Stir constantly with a whisk or a wooden spoon until it boils.

Allow it to boil for 1-2 minutes.

Remove from heat.

Add vanilla.

Syrup will be very thin/watery. Allow to cool completely and it will thicken to about the same consistency as Hershey’s syrup.

Store the syrup in a mason jar or any other container. It will keep for several weeks in the fridge. If you want to be really sneaky, pour the cooled syrup into an empty or almost-empty Hershey’s syrup container and see if anyone notices the difference!

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Homemade Mustard

1106-mustard-powder 

Ingredients

3 eggs

2/3 cup sugar

1 cup vinegar

1 cup dry mustard (3  1 1/3 oz. cans)

Method:

Mix vinegar and mustard and refrigerate overnight.

The next day beat eggs, 2/3 cup sugar, add to vinegar and mustard mixture.  Cook in a double boiler or over low heat until thick.  Let cool and refrigerate.

 

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