Storm the Cassoulet

How to make PORK CHOPS

PORK CHOP

(Recipe below)

HINTS:

Pork is Pork is Pork

This is true with all meat and fish, but especially with pork: There is a huge difference in taste between your typical grocery store pork and well-raised, well-fed heritage pork. It’s worth the extra couple bucks. Here’s why.

Boneless is Better

Generally, we like our meat and poultry to be bone-in. There are a couple of reasons: First, it slows down the meat’s cooking, so it gives you a little more leeway to get a good, crispy sear on your chop. Second, the bone gives the meat a richer flavor. Yeah, you should keep that bone in there.

A Little Salt, a Little Pepper

No. A LOT of salt. A LOT of pepper. As with all meat, you want to season that sucker so much that you can see the salt and pepper on the surface when you’re standing a couple feet away. This will make your crust incredibly flavorful—the combination of salt, caramelized meat, and fat will push your chop over the top.

From Fridge to Frying Pan

Let your chops sit on the counter for about 30 minutes before you begin to cook them. If the meat is too cold, the outside will overcook while the inside comes to the right temperature. Giving the pork a little time to warm up will ensure a nice crust on the outside, with a tender center. (Well, if you follow the next few pieces of advice, that is…)

Let That Pan Rip

For chops, we like to get our pan screaming hot…then take it down to medium. That first blast of heat helps get a good golden crust. But, if you keep it that high, the chop won’t cook evenly through the middle. Medium heat helps keep the outer edges of the meat tender while the center reaches the perfect temperature.

Trust Your Recipe’s Cooking Time

With all meat and poultry—but especially pork chops—use your thermometer to tell when the meat is done cooking. A recipe’s timing is usually a ballpark estimate. Cook your chop until it’s around 135 degrees, then transfer it to a cutting board—the residual heat will bring it to the USDA’s recommended 145 degrees. Pork is pretty easy to dry out, so making sure it’s not a degree over 145 is the best way to get juicy, tender meat.

Trim the Fat

Most pork chops have a little layer of fat around the perimeter—take advantage of it! Instead of cutting it off before or after the chop is cooked, stand the chop on its side in the pan with your tongs and get that fat rendered, brown, and crispy. Trust us, you won’t regret it.

Dig Right In

After you get your pork on the cutting board, don’t touch it for 10 minutes. If you cut into it right away, all its juices will run onto the board instead of getting redistributed into the meat. Don’t let all that delicious liquid run away!

PAN-ROASTED BRINED PORK CHOP

Ingredients:

1/2 cup kosher salt

1/2 cup sugar

1 teaspoon juniper berries

1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

1 head of garlic, halved crosswise, plus 2 unpeeled cloves for basting

2 large sprigs thyme

1 2-inch-thick bone-in pork chop (2 ribs; about 1 1/4 lb.)

2 tablespoons grapeseed or vegetable oil

3 tablespoons unsalted butter

Flaky or coarse sea salt

Preparation:

Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Add kosher salt, sugar, juniper berries, peppercorns, halved head of garlic, and 1 thyme sprig; stir to dissolve salt and sugar. Transfer to a medium bowl and add 5 cups ice cubes. Stir until brine is cool. Add pork chop; cover and chill for at least 8 and up to 12 hours.

Preheat oven to 450°. Set a wire rack inside a rimmed baking sheet. Remove chop from brine; pat dry. Heat oil over medium-high heat in a large cast-iron or other oven-proof skillet. Cook chop until beginning to brown, 3-4 minutes. Turn and cook until second side is beginning to brown, about 2 minutes. Keep turning chop every 2 minutes until both sides are deep golden brown, 10-12 minutes total.

Transfer skillet to oven and roast chop, turning every 2 minutes to prevent it from browning too quickly, until an instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center of meat registers 135°, about 14 minutes. (Chop will continue to cook during basting and resting.)

Carefully drain fat from skillet and place over medium heat. Add butter, 2 unpeeled garlic cloves, and remaining thyme sprig; cook until butter is foamy. Carefully tip skillet and, using a large spoon, baste chop repeatedly with butter until butter is brown and smells nutty, 2-3 minutes.

Transfer pork chop to prepared rack and let rest, turning often to ensure juices are evenly distributed, for 15 minutes. Cut pork from bones, slice, and sprinkle with sea salt.

 

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Beef and Vegetable Lasagna

Lasagna_edited-2

from The New Basics Cookbook

Ingredients:

2 tbsp. olive oil

1 lb. ground beef

5 cups tomato sauce

4 tbsp. chopped fresh Italian (flat leaf) parsley

3 1/2 c. Ricotta cheese

1 c. chopped cooked spinach, well drained; optional

1/4 c. freshly grated Parmesan cheese

1 tbsp. dried oregano

3/4 tsp. ground nutmeg

Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

8 lasagna noodles, cooked until not quite tender

3 c. grated Mozzarella cheese

Optional: add sautéed sausage, sliced zucchini, tomatoes, crushed red pepper, mushrooms

Method:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add the beef, crumbling it into the skillet. Cook, stirring occasionally, until it is browned. Drain, and set aside.

Place the tomato sauce in a saucepan. Add the beef and 2 tablespoons of the parsley, and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat.

In a mixing bowl, combine the Ricotta, spinach, Parmesan, remaining 2 tablespoons parsley, oregano, nutmeg, and pepper; stir well.

Place 2 cups of the tomato sauce in the bottom of a 13 x 9 inch baking dish. Arrange 4 lasagna noodles on top of the sauce. Spread half the Ricotta mixture over the lasagna, and sprinkle with 1 cup of the Mozzarella. Repeat the layers of sauce, noodles, Ricotta, and Mozzarella.

Top with the remaining 2 cups of sauce and 1 cup Mozzarella, sprinkle evenly over the top.

Cover the dish loosely with aluminum foil, place it on a baking sheet, and bake for 45 minutes.

Then remove the foil and bake an additional 20 minutes. Remove the dish from the oven and allow it to rest 10-15 minutes before serving. 8 portions.

NOTE: For individual frozen portions, cut the baked lasagna into eight pieces. Place in freezer container with lids. Freeze when cool. To reheat, defrost and bake, covered with aluminum foil, at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

 

 

 

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Zucchini, Squash, Onion and Cheese Casserole

zucc cass

Ingredients:

2-3 T Olive oil (plus tiny bit more for drizzling at the end)

1 medium onion, sliced thin

3 cloves garlic, finely diced

1 medium zucchini, ends cut off and thinly sliced into circles

1 medium summer squash, ends cut off and thinly sliced into circles

pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

2 cups shredded white cheddar cheese

1/2 cup Rosemary Asiago Cheese (or other cheese of choice)

1/3 +1/4 cup panko crumbs

Grated Parmesan for dusting on top

Salt and pepper to taste

Fresh chopped Italian Parsley for garnish (optional)

Method:

Heat olive oil in a large pan over medium heat, add garlic and onion and saute up, stirring occasionally (careful not to burn the garlic) until softened about 6-8 minutes.

Add zucchini and squash to the same pan and continue cooking, stirring occasionally until softened, about 12 minutes.

Add fresh grated nutmeg, pinch of salt and pepper and stir in well.

Remove from heat and place contents of the pan into a large bowl to let cool slightly.

Preheat oven to 375.

Stir in your 2 1/2 cups cheese and 1/3 cup panko until well combined.

Add contents of bowl to a glass casserole dish (8×8) At this point taste test for salt and pepper – add some only if needed.

sprinkle the top with the remaining panko and Parmesan cheese. Drizzle with just a touch of olive oil.

Place in the oven and bake about 10 minutes or until is gets bubbly around the edges.

Turn on broiler and broil (keeping a close eye) an additional 3-4 minutes until slightly browned on top.

Remove from the oven and let sit about 10 minutes before serving.

Garnish with fresh chopped Italian parsley and enjoy!

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